#PowerShell Weekly 20150915 – The Best New PowerShell Content of the Week

Welcome to #PowerShell Weekly!

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Here is a roundup of PowerShell content from this past week ordered by their social sharing volume.  I manually gather the most shared PowerShell content in Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn.

“Powershell Netcat: PowerCat”
powercat is a powershell function. First you need to load the function before you can execute it. You can put one of the below commands into your powershell profile so powercat is automatically loaded when powershell starts.

Publish date: 9/13/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
17 6 7 18

“Doing More with PowerShell Objects”
In “A PowerShell Tip for Selecting Data Easily,” I guided you from the process of working with objects in the pipeline. I want to bring that topic and scenario back up to explore a few more reasons why I think this is important. If you missed the first article, take a moment to get caught up so you’ll understand my examples.

Publish date: 9/9/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
9 5 25 5

“Use a PowerShell FTP script to upload and download files”

Publish date: 9/8/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
8 1 6 2

“Constant and Read-Only PowerShell Variables”
Most people define a variable in a programming language as a placeholder for something else. The variable is a bucket that stuff goes into, comes out of, gets changed and gets removed. However, there’s a certain subset of PowerShell variables that can be defined but can never change. These sets are called constants and read-only variables.

Publish date: 9/8/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
3 1 10 2
“ScriptRock Supports PowerShell DSC”
Introduced with Windows Server 2012 R2 and continuing through Windows 8.1 and beyond, DSC is a cutting edge technology based on PowerShell which allows admins to define and deploy Windows configurations faster than ever before. It’s not just a token feature—it’s ridiculously powerful, enabling users to manage files, registry settings, processes, services, user accounts, packages, and more in an automated fashion.

Publish date: 9/9/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
16 1 0 0

“How to build the appropriate PowerShell parameters”
A beginner new to writing PowerShell scripts might simply open up his favorite PowerShell script editor and just start coding out what he needs to do.  He may have specific requirements such as create Active Directory (AD) user accounts, setting permission on an Exchange mailbox or perhaps moving some files around. Whatever the case, he has specific requirements: create AD user accounts from the C:Users.csv file, give each user full access to the shared mailbox ConferenceRoom, move all files from \SERVER1c$SomePath to \SERVER2d$SomeOtherPath.

Publish date: 9/8/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
6 0 0 2

“Stories from the PowerShell Trenches: Day 4”
For our fourth and final day for the Stories from the PowerShell Trenches series we’re going to hear from Nigel Thomas. This one is a good one on automating SQL Server and Excel!

Publish date: 9/8/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
2 0 0 2

“Stories from the PowerShell Trenches: Day 2”
Continuing on with our PowerShell stories series next up we have a story from Josh Duffney about automating System Center Orchestrator!

Publish date: 9/8/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
2 0 0 2

“Stories from the PowerShell Trenches: Day 3”
For day 3 of our Stories from the PowerShell Trenches series we have Tim Curwick. Tim has a blog (like all of you should!) and posted this awhile back. With permission, I’m reproducing it here but if you’d like to check out all the other great information Tim puts out head on over to his blog.

Publish date: 9/8/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
2 0 0 2

“Remove unwanted HTML attributes with PowerShell and regular expressions – Blog – Mavention”
I’m currently working on a migration project to migrate content from an old to a new website. Some of the content of the older site contains HTML markup.

Publish date: 9/9/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
1 1 0 0

“Update Windows Defender definitions using Windows PowerShell | Techspree”
For basic security protection against virus and malware, Microsoft has built-in Windows Defender in your Windows 10 / 8 or later running operating systems. This means that you don’t need to install any antivirus programs and Windows Defender will take care of security issues. With Windows 10, this security suite has ability to update antimalware definitions automatically along with Windows Updates.

Publish date: 9/11/2015
Social sharing volume in the past week:
1 0 0 1

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